My Wrap of the 2018 Paddy Pallin

I really enjoyed the 2018 Paddy Pallin event at Kitchener. I had not rogained in the area before, but I look forward to competing there again if the opportunity arises.
The course was interesting because it was large and very well mapped. The map included detail from three Newcastle Orienteering Clubs’ maps and it showed. There was a lot of detail built into the 1:25000 scale. In many respects it was a orienteerer’s course because you needed to constantly check the fine detail on the map to score well.

My team mates and I had a pretty good rogaine. We really only made two errors that cost us more than a minute or so. The first mistake was mine and it was a bit embarrassing. We were looking for control 76 “The Bridge – East side of tunnel”. Because we were looking for a bridge I switched off mentally, because how could anyone walk over a bridge and not notice. Team mate Julian suggested we had just crossed “the bridge” and I ignored him, but I had to eat humble pie about a minute later when I saw a side trail which told me that Julian was right (again). In fairness it wasn’t much of a bridge, it was just a pipe with dirt over it, but this was one of those courses where you just cannot afford to switch off.

The landscape was interesting. There had been mining in the area up until the 60’s and there were many remnants of mining works. There were also many tracks, most of them seemed to be kept open by trail bikes. The course also resembled a bit of a used car cemetery as there were many very old abandoned cars on the course. There were also a lot of controls on the course and they were not so far apart which kept us constantly scanning the map.

The vegetation was almost perfect for rogaining. Much of it was open forest and the thick stuff was marked with the accuracy of an orienteering map. The ground was easy underfoot and notably neither my team mates or I fell over during the event, which is a bit unusual. The weather was also perfect for rogaining it was a cool 15C which is perfect going hard and avoiding heat stress.

Team mate Julian camped at the Kitchener public school on Saturday night while John Clancy and I spent a very civilised night in a motel in Aberdare. I do not mind camping, but with 4C forecasted and lots of motels near by, it was an easy decision. We also got to watch France down Australia in the World Cup in our motel room. We even let Julian watch since his 30+ year old tent did not include a television. In fact the arrangement was perfect, Julian picked up the maps first thing in the morning, and then drove to our motel room to pick us up. We then spent a pleasant hour course planning in McDonalds at Cessnock. My theory is that Julian likes camping just so he can show off his very old tent with dual chimneys. To be fair it is the only tent I know that has dual chimneys, it is also Australian made (Wilderness Equipment), but takes about two days to erect and it’s time he bought himself a new one, without the bloody chimneys.

Julian about two hours into his tent erection, with his chimneys on proud display.

The day was also notable because the event included many competitors who are legends of our sport. At the end of the event, Peter Tuft, one of the founders of rogaining in NSW spoke about the 2019 Australian Champs which he is organising in Tasmania (book your holiday now).  Another one of the founders of our sport, Bert van Netten, competed and he and his partner, Ted Woodley, beat my team. Not only did they score 190 points more than we did, they also walked about 2 kms less. We will get them next time. Another founder of our sport, Ian Dempsey, vetted the course.

Historically rogaine maps were off the shelf maps (the Navshield event still is) with red circles drawn on freehand. The 2018 PP rogaine has set a new standard in terms of mapping detail and accuracy for a 1:25000 map. Is this the natural evolution of our sport or are we in danger of going overboard? Certainly this event set a mapping standard that can only be maintained with the aid of orienteering base maps. Having said that, the fine detail was appreciated when trying to find controls in a complex jigsaw of eroded gulleys.

Chris Relaxing

Overall, we had a really enjoyable event and we hope everyone else did as well. Sam Howe did a great job with the course. There was a heap of route choice and teams spread out nicely across the course. Bob Gilbert did a great job coordinating the event and acting as MC at the presentation. Bob and the Newcastle team are very active supporters of rogaining and their work is greatly appreciated.  Also a big thank you to the Paddy Pallin organisation for their ongoing support of our sport.

The only thing that could have made the day better would have been beating Ted and Bert, but we will have to wait to the next event to do that.

5 Replies to “My Wrap of the 2018 Paddy Pallin”

  1. Thanks for these encouraging comments Chris. However, given the “Chris relaxing” photo, it’s clear that you need to take your on-course rogaining more seriously if you’re to beat Ted and Bert. Further, I suspect that whatever substances were being smoked in Julian’s tent (I assume the tent chimneys are used to vent this), have impeded your team’s performance.

  2. I found it a very enjoyable event. I thought the course was well set with lots of route choice, the controls were all accurately placed (except possibly a slight question mark on 53, which seemed a little too far NE to us) and the terrain was generally very pleasant.

    After just about dissolving in the heat-stressed Minigaine, the conditions were close to ideal, and we bumped into plenty of familiar faces out on the course, so all in all it was good fun. If I could have just not had that adductor cramp three minutes from the end it would have been perfect!

  3. I really enjoyed the day, and it was such a perfect course to introduce people to the sport that I was very sorry I hadn’t press-ganged a whole bunch of newbies along! The controls that we found were incredibly accurately placed, and the only error we made was because we were speeding along faster than usual and reckoned we weren’t there yet! (Seven minutes later we realised we had, in fact, overshot #93 quite badly!) A great day and many thanks to everyone. By the way, the camping was very nice with lovely school loos and some charming chooks to say hello to in the morning…what a nice school.

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